An incredible image of a star nursery taken by Hubble in 1995. Look at the updated version from NASA.

The iconic star nursery with thick pillars of gas and dust, known as the Pillars of Creation, was initially photographed by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope almost 30 years ago. Scientists are now better understanding how stars develop thanks to the most precise image of the terrain ever taken by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.

The James Webb Space Telescope’s images of the Pillars of Creation show that they resemble spires and arches and are filled with a semi-transparent gas and dust. Young stars are forming in this region. NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Anton M. Koekemoer, Alyssa Pagan, and Joseph DePasquale hide caption

switch to caption NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan, Joseph DePasquale (STScI) The James Webb Space Telescope’s images of the Pillars of Creation show that they resemble spires and arches and are filled with a semi-transparent gas and dust. Young stars are forming in this region.

NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan, Joseph DePasquale (STScI) The James Webb telescope, hailed as the replacement for the venerable Hubble, is designed to see near- and mid-infrared light that is invisible to humans, enabling it to see through dust that can hide stars and other objects in Hubble photos. Although NASA claims that James Webb’s infrared eyes were not able to pierce through a combination of gas and dust in the Pillars of Creation to reveal a substantial number of galaxies, its new vision will assist researchers in determining more accurate counts of freshly born stars as well as the amount of gas and dust in the area.

SCIENCE Seeing a desire from the public, James Webb project scientist Klaus Pontoppidan, stated on Twitter that the team planned to use the new space telescope to photograph the Pillars of Creation.

The Milky Way’s plane is where the M16 nebula is located, and there are a ton of stars there. penned Pontoppidan. “This image spans an area the same size on the sky and was captured in exactly the same way as the cosmic cliffs.”

The Pillars of Creation were captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995 as seen on the left image. The scene as captured by the James Webb telescope in 2022 is depicted in the right image. NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan, Joseph DePasquale (STScI). remove caption

switch to caption NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan, Joseph DePasquale (STScI). The Pillars of Creation were captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995 as seen on the left image. The scene as captured by the James Webb telescope in 2022 is depicted in the right image.

NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan, Joseph DePasquale (STScI). James Webb was complimented by Kirsten Banks , an astronomer and scientific communicator, for reviewing the Pillars of Creation and providing more accurate information for researchers to use in understanding how stars are formed.

In addition to the obvious stars that can be seen in every nook and cranny of this image, Banks claimed in an Twitter video that if you look attentively at the tops of the pillars, you can see this flaming heat. It appears to be a volcano spewing lava, thus

SPACE young stars , which is thought to be a few hundred thousand years old and emits supersonic jets that excite nearby hydrogen molecules and produce the crimson glow, is the source of the red spots at the borders of some pillars.

James Webb’s success came after more than 20 years of technical challenges, cost overruns, delays, and threats from Congress to scrap the telescope entirely. The Webb’s primary mirror boasted six times more light collecting area rather than the Hubble’s, which led some critics to question its enormous size.

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