For leading the Brexit campaign to leave the European Union and then winning an 80-seat majority in the 2019 general election, including many areas where the left-leaning opposition Labour Party traditionally dominates, Johnson continues to enjoy support from some lawmakers and activists across the nation.

Johnson’s appeal is largely based on the belief that he is the only person who can turn around the party’s fortunes, especially with Labour currently leading and the Conservatives trailing in the polls.

But many people still recall the original reasons Johnson was made to leave.

His retirement was brought on by the resignation of two top ministers and a larger internal uprising that followed a senior lawmaker’s alleged sexual assault that ended months of controversies.

Johnson is still being investigated by the parliamentary committee for allegedly lying about “Partygate,” in which he and his employees hosted unlawful gatherings during the worst Covid lockdown. He disputes the allegation, but if proven guilty, he might lose his position in the House of Commons or perhaps be suspended from the legislature.

Johnson’s personal approval rating plunged to -42% at the height of this controversy, which enraged a populace that had been legally compelled to stay at home.

One ex-coworker in the Cabinet did not anticipate a Johnson comeback.

“Quite simply, I think it’s crazy. He is largely to blame for the current predicament, according to former attorney general Dominic Grieve, who spoke to NBC News.

He used dishonesty, boosterism, and manipulation of the Conservative Party to mask the lack of any practical initiatives. Grieve, who was expelled from the party for voting against the government on a crucial Brexit vote, called it a con job.

Grieve claimed that the “fantasies that undergird the strategy” were the reason why Truss failed. He continued, “Johnson is the father of Trussism in this sense.”

Johnson is renowned for his ability to win elections, but according to one observer, his unpopularity with the electorate negates this.

“Even if you accept the theory that he was responsible for the victory in 2019—a claim that is, at best, quite debatable—everything that has transpired since implies that no longer holds any appeal. None,” declared Rob Ford, a University of Manchester British politics specialist.

“His followers appear to believe that the people would simply forget everything that occurred three months ago or a year ago, but this won’t happen. He is burned toast, and you can’t unburn the toast.

“He is gone, he is done, and he is an electoral disaster area,” continued Ford.
An inquiry for comment was not immediately answered by Johnson’s parliamentary office.

THERESA SUNAK

The former investment banker who became a politician served as Johnson’s finance minister and developed his own personal brand and reputation through a smart social media strategy and well-liked policies to ease financial strain during the pandemic.

Both experts and bookmakers believe Sunak will triumph.

Sunak, who was frequently hailed as the nation’s first British Asian prime minister, lost the Conservative leadership election to Truss in September following a campaign in which he constantly warned that her economic plans were both reckless and inflationary.

His supporters are now emphasizing how accurate he was, portraying him as the best person to boost the nation’s legitimacy and stabilize its faltering economy.

Lawmaker John Glen posted on Twitter on Friday afternoon, “I have seen Rishi’s seriousness of purpose, talents, and willingness to put the nation’s interests before his own.”

More Conservative legislators supported Sunak than Truss, however Sunak lost the final vote among the members. He may be the front-runner for nominations from lawmakers once more, making him the strongest choice to avert another internal uprising.

However, some of the former prime minister’s allies hold him accountable for Johnson’s demise and won’t likely support Sunak as prime minister.

His plans were derailed in April when it was revealed that his wife was saving millions of dollars in taxes due to her nondomiciled status, which means that she is classified as having a foreign base for tax purposes.

She quickly revoked this title, but the media attention highlighted the couple’s enormous riches, which was constantly a topic of conversation in a nation fixated on social class and position.

MORDAUNT, Penny

Penny Mordaunt, a seasoned minister and MP who has yet to be put to the test in any of the “major offices of state” in the British government, is much less well known to the general public (prime minister, finance minister, foreign secretary and home secretary).

Despite having backed the Brexit movement, she is seen as a more moderate voice than many other Brexit activists. Mordaunt, who is presently in charge of the House of Commons, finished third in the summertime election to succeed Johnson.

On Friday, Mordaunt became the first contender to formally enter the race. In announcing her candidacy, she stated, “I’ve been heartened by support from colleagues who want a fresh start, an unified party, and leadership in the national interest.”

Her backers are promoting her as a candidate for unification—someone who can steer the ship without squabbling over differences of opinion.

She can “appeal not just to all groups within the parliamentary party, but also who will reach out to members and voters with a bright, optimistic message of regeneration and optimism,” according to Iain Dale, an analyst who supports the Conservatives.

Mordaunt, a former naval reservist, may be most known for his appearance on “Splash,” a somewhat forgotten TV program in which famous people competed in diving.

SUELLA BRAVERMANBraverman played a role in setting the course of events that led to Truss’s resignation this week.

Although she left the government due to a security breach and had only been home secretary for 43 days, she took aim at the departing prime minister in her resignation letter.

In the summer’s leadership election, Braverman ran a losing campaign against Truss.
She appeals to the Brexit-supporting, anti-European part of the Conservative Party as a radical right-winger who is tough on immigration and “woke” culture war topics.
She criticized the “Guardian-reading, tofu-eating wokerati” this week in Parliament for a string of disorderly rallies by climate campaigners.

She famously remarked that her “dream” was to witness a plane load of migrants departing for Rwanda from Britain. Britain’s practice of sending asylum seekers to the country in central Africa has drawn condemnation from throughout the world.

By relocating to England in 1968, Braverman’s own father fled political turmoil in Kenya.
The current trade secretary and unexpected breakout candidate in the Conservative leadership contest last summer is KEMI BADENOCHA.

She was born in London to Nigerian parents when she was 42 years old, and she has gained recognition for criticizing a purportedly liberal worldview in public life.

Both Badenoch and Braverman are expected to receive support from a comparable segment of the party, although neither is thought to have a chance of unseating the three front-runners, Johnson, Sunak, and Mordaunt.

SIR KEIR STARMER?

In the meantime, opposition leaders are calling for a general election so that the general public can have a say during such a crucial period for the nation.

It seems doubtful that this would occur considering how far behind the Conservatives are in surveys and the fact that there isn’t a vote required until January 2025.

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