Residents of Kentucky now deal with extreme temperatures and power disruptions following disastrous floods.

On Monday, flooding in the Troublesome Creek near Main Street in Hindman, Kentucky, washed a truck away. hide caption Amanda Rossmann/Courier Journal via AP

switch to caption AP

by Amanda Rossmann/Courier Journal On Monday, flooding in the Troublesome Creek near Main Street in Hindman, Kentucky, washed a truck away.

via AP, Amanda Rossmann/Courier Journal KY – FRANKFORT On Tuesday, the rain that had caused the devastating floods in the Appalachian mountain towns was ceasing, leaving the survivors to deal with a new danger: frying in the sun as they attempt to recover.

“It’s going to become quite hot. We now face a new weather challenge because of that “At his briefing on the tragedy on Tuesday morning, Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear remarked.

More remains were discovered in the demolished landscape on Monday, bringing the death toll to 37. Although more than 1,300 people have been evacuated, crews are still working to reach other residents who are still blocked off by floods or mudslides, he said. Hundreds of individuals were still missing, but that figure should decline if cell phone service is restored and people can communicate that they are alive.

“There is utter destruction everywhere. Rebuilding will take a long time. People were left with nothing at all. Homes that are completely gone and whose locations we do not know. And we keep discovering the remains of our deceased brothers and sisters “explained Beshear.

A depressing conclusion to last week’s unprecedented floods, the National Weather Service cautioned that slow-moving showers and thunderstorms might cause more flash flooding into Tuesday morning near streams swollen by Sunday’s heavy rain. This includes nearby West Virginia and Virginia communities, where some residents are still without power.

On Saturday, the river in Breathitt County, Kentucky, was still high surrounding the residences, as shown in this overhead photo. hide caption Michael Clevenger/Courier Journal via AP

switch to caption AP Photo/Michael Clevenger/Courier Journal)

On Saturday, the river in Breathitt County, Kentucky, was still high surrounding the residences, as shown in this overhead photo.

(Source: AP and Michael Clevenger, Courier Journal) More than 9,600 people in eastern Kentucky are still without electricity, so cooling stations are being put up in buildings that were spared from the flooding, Beshear said.

“We announced the need for cooling stations as the temperature began to rise. And they have already been set up, even before this heat. We might be ahead of the weather for the first time ever “said he.

“I am aware that you might be attempting to salvage what you can. But when it becomes hot on Wednesday and Thursday, be extremely cautious “warned the governor. “We are bringing in truckloads of water. We’ll make sure there’s enough for you. But at the very least, you’ll need a cool spot to rest.”

That location served as an emergency refuge for hundreds of people whose homes had been damaged or destroyed. According to Beshear, as of Tuesday, 191 additional people were temporarily sheltered in state parks, and over 430 people were residing in 11 of these shelters.

Eastern Kentucky, southern West Virginia, and western Virginia all experienced 8 to 10 1/2 inches (20 to 27 centimeters) of rain in under 48 hours. National President Joe Biden declared a federal disaster to provide aid money to counties inundated.

The catastrophe was the most recent in a spate of disastrous downpours that battered areas of the United States this summer, including St. Louis. Scientists warn that the occurrence of such catastrophes is increasing due to climate change.

The 90-year-old grandmother of Chris Campbell, proprietor of Letcher Funeral Home in Whitesburg, claimed she lost the whole house she had resided in since 1958. She was able to flee to a neighbor’s home carrying only a few pictures. The rest is no longer there. He is currently in charge of making funeral preparations for people he knew personally, including a 67-year-old woman who suffered a heart attack while trying to flee the rising water.

“Most of these people are people we know. We live in a small town “He was speaking of a town that was 177 kilometers (110 miles) southeast of Lexington. Everyone is affected by it.

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