Trump’s proposals, according to Matt Yglesias, are “far more moderate” and “not that extreme” than Romney’s.

On a New York Times podcast, a liberal journalist argued that former President Trump’s professed policy beliefs are “simply not that extreme.”

On the podcast “Ezra Klein Show,” Yglesias argued that Trump is more moderate than other establishment Republicans like Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, who was the party’s 2012 presidential nominee.

I just want to be careful in what I’m saying because I’m aware of how intense the reactions are. However, Yglesias argued that Donald Trump’s declared policy positions are simply not that extreme.

“The stances he adopted on immigration are fairly similar to those Mitt Romney adopted.” Compared to Romney’s positions from 2012, his economic policy stances are far more moderate. His most extreme suggestions, such as outright banning Muslims from entering the nation, do better in polls than many other, quote unquote, “mainstream” viewpoints, according to Yglesias.

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Trump, who initially ran for president in 2016 as an outsider candidate who decried the political establishment of both parties, has frequently defended Social Security and has never tried to reduce its benefits for Americans.

According to Yglesias, “He didn’t come out and say, oh, we should privatize Social Security and get masses roaring for him.”

He went on to say that what he had done was to say, “Let’s not do the most toxically unpopular stuff that the Republican Party used to stand for.”

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On WROK radio in 2016, Trump supported Social Security and blasted Republican politicians for attacking the program. Paul “Ryan” wants to seriously undermine Social Security. He wants to drastically cut Medicare… I want to maintain Social Security. I’m not going to raise the ages, I’m not going to trim it, and I’m not going to do anything they ask of me. The Republicans, though, want to cut it significantly, and I’m not going to do that. They genuinely want to slash it.

Social Security cutbacks are opposed on the grounds that workers have already paid necessary taxes into the program on the understanding that they would eventually receive benefits from it. Cutback supporters contend that the program is not financially viable.

Klein agreed with Yglesias that the Republican Party’s stance on economic policy had changed as a result of Trump. According to Klein, “I agree that people undervalue the extent to which Trump changed the Republican Party’s economic policy substance toward a more centrist position from, say, Paul Ryan.”

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